Monday, January 27, 2014


Organization and focus are key qualities for many successful adults, but these skills do not come naturally to all. I know so many kids and teens that have some sort of Executive Functioning challenges and I found this information to be very interesting and extremely helpful!

Many times, kids start off the school year strong and very organized and as they shift to the second part of the school year a lot of kids go on cruise control and get themselves into messy waters. Here are some great tips from The Glenholme School to keep your kids on track!

Maryann Campbell, Executive Director of The Glenholme School, offers a few tips to assist all parents and children:

1.       Stash and trash – Prevent mountains of papers from accumulating by learning what to keep and what to toss. This is a very important skill, even for the most organized adults! Teach children at a young age what types of documents to keep and throw away as well as how to best organize the materials they are keeping. Your future storage bins will thank you! 

2.       Balancing work and fun – It is important to teach children that there is a time for work and a time for play, and that they are both important for a well-balanced life! Make time for studying, afterschool activities and dinner with the family.

3.       Manage the day – Parents have planners, and so should children! Teach your child to use a day planner or calendar, where they can record their school work, after-school activities, social events and family time.  Whether it is paper or digital, it doesn’t matter. The point is that the child learns to manage their time and sets realistic expectations for each day.

4.       Organize assignments – Parents can help their children stay organized with color-coded folders and a desk-top storage system for their school work.  Children also really enjoy label makers. Divide the folders and storage containers by subject, and teach children how to label accordingly.

5.       Lightening the backpack without losing the work – We’ve all witnessed the tiny child with the gigantic backpack that weighs nearly as much as they do, as well as the extreme opposite of the student who shows up to class without a pen or paper. Teaching children to carry what is important for the day will help them be better prepared for class. Go over the day’s activities the night before, make a list of what classes and activities the child has and pack accordingly.

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